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10 fun facts about Canada Day that will make you smile!

It’s Canada Day! Our national holiday has fireworks, burgers, and cold drinks. Most Canadians enjoy the national holiday, but few know its history. These facts will impress your neighbors.

Canada Day is not always called Canada Day

Canada-Day-facts
Canada-Day-facts

Too many names? Many may be surprised to find Canada Day wasn’t always popular. Dominion Day was renamed Canada Day after 100 years, in 1982. The first Dominion Day was celebrated on July 1, 1867, when Upper Canada, Lower Canada, Nova Scotia, and New Brunswick were unified under one British Empire dominion.

How to Celebrate Canada Day Revealed by Canadians in 2022

Sometimes Canada’s birthday is July 2

Since its foundation, July 1 has been Canada Day. This holiday sometimes falls on Sunday. When this happens, Canada Day is celebrated on July 2. (in most places). Exceptions are Nova Scotia, Newfoundland, and Labrador (Canada Day is the first day of July). Many people who celebrate the occasion would still party all weekend if they could.

First Canada Day was July 1, 1867.

Canada-Day-facts
Canada-Day-facts

In 1867, the North America Act created a holiday. This event, called Canada’s birthday, marks a major milestone in Canadian history. On this day, the four Canadian colonies unified and became a force within the British Empire. On June 20, 1868, a royal proclamation ordered Canadians to celebrate in Ottawa.

Early festivals are small.

Canada Day, or Dominion Day, was a modest celebration in the late 1860s. First, participants will ring church/cathedral bells, ignite bonfires, and enjoy modern music. These celebrations are mainly limited to Ottawa. Larger celebrations didn’t begin until 1917. Later in 1958, government-sponsored festivals were held. Government-sponsored events are limited to the capital. Dominion Day began on TV in the 1960s, but it didn’t happen until 1980. That day of dominance has spread beyond the capital.

Moving Day, Beer, and Canada

Canada-Day-facts
Canada-Day-facts

Despite its humble and semi-peaceful beginnings, Canada Day is now a fireworks-filled independence party with parades, picnics, and barbecues. Many people celebrate Canada Day by drinking beer (expect to see more than a few flip-cup images). This is the time to sing O Canada with all your heart. Don’t be shocked to see moving trucks in Quebec’s province on Canada Day. In Quebec, tenancies finish on July 1.

Global vacation

Canada Day became official in 1982. Canada Day strives to become internationally famous with a new name and national recognition. Since 2006 (in London’s Trafalgar Square), tourists can enjoy festivals in North America and the UK. Canadian alumni and students are also organizing commemorative events in Mexico, China, and Hong Kong.

Bath race

Nanaimo, a British Columbia town, will have one race in the Canada Day tub. This unique community reportedly thought fireworks and fanfare weren’t enough to honor the event. Nanaimo celebrated Canada Day with the world’s first bathtub race. After 100 years, the bathtub race was pushed back to avoid Canada Day. The Great World Championship Bathtub Race and the 4-Day Marine Festival are already formed, so visit Canada in July.

Joining isn’t wrong.

Canada-Day-facts
Canada-Day-facts

These are some reasons to celebrate Canada Day or visit this summer. Canada Day can be celebrated as you like. For many, Canada Day is a celebration of independence, a chance to reflect on Canada’s past, a reason to learn O Canada lyrics, a reason to drink a beer and race downhill in the bathtub, and for others, it’s Moving Day. You can select your own experience as a travel companion, historical buff, ex-lover, or student.

Canada Day has several famous birthdays.

Pamela Anderson, Dan Akroyd, Lady Diana, Princess of Wales, Missy Elliott, Jamie Farr, Rod Gilbert, Debbie Harry, Olivia de Havilland, Estee Lauder, Carl Lewis, Sydney Pollack, Alan Ruck, Liv Tyler.

Chinese people used to hate this day

On July 1, 1923, Canada passed the Chinese Immigration Act, prohibiting all Chinese immigration. Chinese Canadians refused to celebrate Dominion Day on July 1 until 1947, when the practice was ended.

Maris Lopez
Maris Lopezhttp:////my-lifestyle.co
Hey there! I'm Maris, an American girl who is passionate about adventure, the outdoors and all things travel!
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