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What Makes The Tessellated Pavement Tasmania Remarkable?

The Tessellated Pavement in Tasmania is a photographer’s dream come true, and for a good reason. The most obvious reason is the sky-mirroring effect created by the unique rock formations. But the formation of the pavement itself is also interesting. This article also covers activities around the area and how to take the best photos of the Tessellated Pavement so you can make the most of your visit!

How Did The Tessellated Pavement Form?

sunset-at-tessellated-pavement-tasmania
sunset-at-tessellated-pavement-tasmania

A tessellated pavement is a form of rock surface that has been fractured into more or less regular rectangles, blocks that resemble rectangles, or irregular or regular polygons. The name of this form of rock pavement comes from the fact that it is fragmented into polygonal chunks that resemble mosaic floor tiles, or tessellations.

Tasmania, Australia, is home to the world’s most well-known tessellated pavement. This pavement is notable for its elaborate design and for being one of the world’s largest examples of tessellated paving.

What Makes The Tessellated Pavement In Tasmania Remarkable?

rainbow-spotted-at-tessellated-pavement-tasmania
rainbow-spotted-at-tessellated-pavement-tasmania

The Tessellated Pavement in Tasmania is a remarkable spot because of its unique rock formations. The rocks are arranged in a geometric pattern that looks like tessellated pavement. The pavement is made up of three different types of rock: dolerite, siltstone, and shale. Dolerite and siltstone are the main rocks that make up the pavement, while shale is the rock that fills in the spaces between the other two rocks.

Top 7 Must-See Attractions Around The Tessellated Pavement In Tasmania

After you’re done exploring and taking photos of the Tessellated Pavement, be sure to check out these wonderful attractions around the pavement in Tasmania:

The Candlestick And Totem Pole

candlestick-and-totem-pole-tasmania
candlestick-and-totem-pole-tasmania

Candlestick and Totem Pole are two other remarkable rock formations in Tasman National Park. The volcanic activity that pushed magma to the surface formed these rocks, which cooled at a constant rate and created rare hexagonal pillars. Candlesticks and Totem Poles have become symbols of the strength of nature, standing tall and strong against the current. They are also popular with rock climbers who enjoy the challenge they offer.

Eaglehawk Neck Historic Site

eaglehawk-neck-historic-site
eaglehawk-neck-historic-site

Eaglehawk Neck is a great place to start your journey if you want to learn more about the Tasman Peninsula’s fascinating convict history! The isthmus of land at Eaglehawk Neck is very narrow, so Port Arthur was the perfect spot to build a prison there. For security reasons, the “Dog Line” stretched across the isthmus from Pirates Bay to Eaglehawk Bay. Today, you can see a life-size replica of these monsters near the local Community Hall.

Port Arthur Historic Site

port-arthur-heritage-site-tasmania
port-arthur-heritage-site-tasmania

Speaking of Port Arthur, this is a must-see in Tasmania. This sprawling complex of 30 historic buildings from the 18th and 19th centuries is situated along the Tasman Sea, and has a fascinating history that continues to draw visitors today. You can learn more about the area’s history with interactive and informative tours that the site provides, like the “Escape from Port Arthur Tour” or the “Isle of the Dead Cemetery Tour”.

Tasmans Arch

tasmans-arch
tasmans-arch

Tasmania is home to many natural wonders, and Tasmans Arch is one of them. Tasmans Arch is a tall natural bridge in the sea cliffs that provides visitors with spectacular views of the cavern-like hole that was once a sea cave. The Tasman Sea has eroded the cave over thousands of years, and today it is a popular tourist destination. Much like the Tessellated Pavement, Tasmans Arch is a paradise for great photos!

Devils Kitchen

devils-kitchen-tasmania
devils-kitchen-tasmania

Devils Kitchen is a deep trench located near Tasmans Arch and the Tessellated Pavement. It started out as a cave, but over time it has eroded into a tall, narrow gap with steep cliffs. The most special feature about Devils Kitchen is that it looks like somebody took a giant axe and swung it into the side of a cliff, creating a perfect cut. So if you ever get the chance to visit Devils Kitchen, make sure to bring your camera so you can take some pictures of this natural wonder!

The Bicheno Blowhole

the-bicheno-blowhole
the-bicheno-blowhole

Bicheno is a charming tiny fishing and holiday town on Tasmania’s east coast. While the town is pretty on its own, the real highlight of this charming town is the natural wonder of the Bicheno Blowhole. The Bicheno Blowhole is a spectacular coastal fountain carved out of solid granite by millennia of erosion. This fascinating scene is even more dramatic because of the large, upright boulder that towers next to the blowhole.

Tasmanian Devil Unzoo

tasmanian-devil-unzoo
tasmanian-devil-unzoo

This is the world’s first unzoo, where you can get up close with the animals, go on wildlife adventures, and explore a Tasmanian native garden. You’ll discover lots of special animals of the Tasmanian bush, including their famous devils. Most of the creatures here are wild, not captive, which is much better for them.

How To Take The Best Photos In Tessellated Pavement Tasmania?

tessellated-pavement-tasmania
tessellated-pavement-tasmania

Pick The Right Time Of The Day

Taking photos of this tessellated pavement at the right time is essential to getting great shots. The lighting and color of the sky can make or break the look of your photos, so avoid taking them during the middle of the day when the light is harsh and the colors are bland. Instead, try to shoot during sunrise or sunset for a softer light and more vibrant colors. Starry nights can also add a magical touch to your photos.

Snap At The Right Angles

Tessellated pavements create an amazing optical illusion. They look like fractured mirrors. So low and broad perspectives are ideal for taking photos of this tessellated pavement. This is because they depict both the rock structure and the sky. You can also navigate your camera lens to overlook the whole water body along with faraway ranges. Which will make your photos look more epic.

Take Advantage Of The Special Mirroring Effect Of The Tessellated Pavement

Undoubtedly, the best photos of the tessellated pavement capture the lack of boundaries between the water and the sky. At the right time and from the right angle, you can take a picture of the sun appearing to clone itself on the bay’s surface and the rocks. The warm hue of the sunset reflecting off the water also gives your photos a very dreamy look. If you have a camera that can take nightly pictures, you can also explore and take photos in this infinite gallery of stars.

Be Steady

This site can get slippery, so be careful with your footing. You might also want to dress down to avoid getting your clothes dirty while exploring and taking photos of the tessellated pavement.

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Maris Lopez
Maris Lopezhttp:////my-lifestyle.co
Hey there! I'm Maris, an American girl who is passionate about adventure, the outdoors and all things travel!
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