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Top 7 Easy Hiking Trails In Whistler For Newbies

Hiking is one of the best things to do in Whistler. If you are not a professional hiker, this article is for you. Here are the easiest hiking trails in Whistler for newbies, such as Lost Lake, Rainbow Falls, Cheakamus Lake, Nairn Falls, and more.

Whistler: One Of The Best Towns In Canada

Whistler is a town north of Vancouver, British Columbia, that is home to Whistler Blackcomb, one of North America’s largest ski resorts. Aside from skiing and snowboarding, the Olympic Park, which hosted the 2010 Winter Olympics in Vancouver, also offers snowshoeing, tobogganing, and ski jumping. Whistler’s central business district is a compact, chalet-style pedestrian village at the base of Whistler and Blackcomb mountains.

Getting To Whistler

Whistler is a resort town in British Columbia, Canada. The Sea to Sky Highway, also known as Highway 99, is a 1.5-hour drive from Vancouver. You can take a shuttle bus if you don’t want to drive yourself.

Best Time To Hike In Whistler

Whistler is located high in the Coast Mountains. This means that the hiking season is only from June to September. In general, the valley bottom trails become snow-free in April or May, while higher-elevation trails remain snowy until July. Snow had returned to the mountains by late September. Check the weather forecast before you go hiking, no matter what time of year it is. Checking the weather is one of the many things you should do before going on a hike.

Read more 10 Most Exciting Activities In Whistler Are Waiting For You To Experience

Top Easy Hiking Trails In Whistler

Lost Lake Hiking Trail In Whistler

lost-lake-trail
lost-lake-trail

The Lost Lake Trail runs almost through Whistler Village. The hike to the lake is a short one through the forest. The trail is relatively flat and smooth, making it suitable for strollers. Follow the trail around the lake, then retrace your steps back to the trailhead on the main trail. On hot summer days, take a swim break at the lake. A vast network of multi-use trails winds its way around the area if you want to add some extra distance. Some of them also visit viewpoints. Just keep an eye out for mountain bikes.

Rainbow Falls

Rainbow-Falls
Rainbow-Falls

If the hike to Rainbow Lake is too long, simply continue on the trail to Rainbow Falls. The falls are not visible from the main trail, but they can be reached via a side trail. The falls are most beautiful during the spring runoff, but they are beautiful all year.

Riverside and Farside Trails

This easy loop hike follows the Riverside and Farside Trails (also known as the Cheakamus River Trail) through the Whistler Interpretive Forest along the banks of the Cheakamus River. It is located in the Cheakamus Crossing neighborhood, just south of Whistler, and was the site of the Whistler Olympic Village. Cross the Cheakamus River on a suspension bridge halfway through the hike, then return to the trailhead on the opposite bank.

Cheakamus Lake

Cheakamus-Lake-hiking-trails-whistler
Cheakamus-Lake-hiking-trails-whistler

This is one of Whistler’s best easy hikes. It follows the shores of Cheakamus Lake through an old-growth forest. Because of glacial runoff, the lake has beautiful turquoise-blue water. You can hike to the west end of the lake for a 7km round trip hike or continue along the trail until it ends at Singing Creek for a 14km round trip hike. While the water appears beautiful, it is extremely cold, so swim at your own risk.

Whistler Train Wreck

Whistler-Train-Wreck
Whistler-Train-Wreck

Whistler Train Wreck is one of the most unusual trails in the area. In the 1950s, a train derailed in the area. The cars are still lying in the forest, covered in graffiti and surrounded by mountain bike trails. The hike to the wreck is easy and flat, and it includes a suspension bridge over the Cheakamus River. In the winter, the Whistler Train Wreck Trail is ideal for snowshoeing.

Related post 10 useful things to know before going to Whistler, Canada

Brandywine Falls

Brandywine-Falls-hiking-trails-whistler
Brandywine-Falls-hiking-trails-whistler

This short and easy hike leads to one of the most beautiful waterfalls in the Whistler area: Brandywine Falls. It drops 70 meters down volcanic basalt cliffs into the canyon below. A viewing platform provides an excellent view of the falls. There are other trails in the park if you want to go on a longer hike. Snowshoeing is also popular in the winter at Brandywine Falls.

Nairn Falls

nairn-falls-hiking-trails-whistler
nairn-falls-hiking-trails-whistler

This easy hike follows the Green River’s banks to the 60-meter-high Nairn Falls. It’s one of several excellent waterfall hikes in the area. The falls cascade down through smooth granite rocks that have been eroded by thousands of years of flowing water. Two platforms provide excellent views of the falls.

Joffre Lakes

Joffre-Lakes-hike
Joffre-Lakes-hike

The popular Joffre Lakes hike isn’t in Whistler; it’s closer to the towns of Pemberton and Mount Currie. However, because Joffre Lakes is popular as a day trip from Whistler, I’ve included it on this list. The hike takes you to three stunning turquoise lakes and past a waterfall. There are breathtaking views of the surrounding mountains and glaciers from the third lake. The Joffre Lakes trail near Whistler can get extremely crowded, so go on a weekday if possible.

Crater Rim Hiking Trail In Whistler

crater-rim-trail-whistler
crater-rim-trail-whistler

The Crater Rim trail circles the Whistler Interpretive Forest, high above Loggers Lake. The lake itself is an extinct volcanic crater. The trail passes several beautiful viewpoints as it ascends above the lake. You could combine the Crater Rim Trail with the Riverside Trail or other trails in the Interpretive Forest for a longer hike.

High Note Hiking Trail In Whistler

High-Note-Trail-Whistler
High-Note-Trail-Whistler

The High Note Trail is one of the newest and most beautiful trails in Whistler. You climb to the very top of Whistler Peak, then descend in a loop. Beautiful views of Cheakamus Lake below and Black Tusk across the valley can be found along the way. The trail comes to an end at a junction with the Musical Bumps Trail, which you can use to continue your descent to the Roundhouse Lodge. Alternatively, continue along the Bumps to Singing Pass. If the High Note Trail is too long for you, there’s the halfway point called the Half Note.

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Anna
Annahttps://my-lifestyle.co/
If you want to travel the world through blogs then my articles will satisfy you. With a never-ending journey, I'll take you to the best cities and exciting experiences!
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