Sunday, July 14, 2024
HomeDestinations9 Old Churches In Amsterdam That Are Well Worth A Visit

9 Old Churches In Amsterdam That Are Well Worth A Visit

In Amsterdam, numerous religious structures have been constructed over the years. They include a number of significant and beautiful churches that are still in existence today. A few of them are worth visiting because they are fascinating historical structures and amazing works of architecture and art. Here are 9 beautiful old churches in Amsterdam that are worth a visit.

A succinct history of religion in Amsterdam

Prior to 1578, when the city sided with Reformed Protestantism in the European religious wars, Amsterdam was a significant location for Catholics. They even called it the “Holy City” or “Hohe Stadt”. This is where the renowned Middle Ages Eucharistic miracle that attested to Christ’s presence occurred in 1345. Since 1881, the anniversary of this event has been commemorated in Amsterdam on March 15 with a quiet evening parade known as Stille Omgang.

Catholics were denied the right to publicly exercise their religion for decades following the Reformation. Oude Kerk, Westerkerk, and Nieuwekerk, the three largest churches in Amsterdam, were all Protestant. Although tolerated, Catholic churches were compelled to conceal themselves, frequently inside other buildings. They include the attic of the canal house now home to the Our Lord in the Attic Church museum.

The Jewish community has long been a significant aspect of Amsterdam’s culture. Jews have historically supported The House of Orange. The Nazis destroyed several Jewish Ashkenazi synagogues between 1940 and 1945, the height of World War II and the horror of the Holocaust. The Jewish History Museum is currently housed in some of them after being refurbished. Amsterdam also features a stunning historic synagogue that was established in 1675 for the Portuguese Sephardic community. The Nazis did not destroy the monument.

9 Historic Churches in Amsterdam

Oude Kerk: The oldest churches in Amsterdam

Oude-Kerk-oldest-church-in-amsterdam
Oude-Kerk-oldest-church-in-Amsterdam

It should be no surprise that Oude Kerk has a fascinating past, given that it is the oldest structure in Amsterdam. The church was initially used for Catholic worship after being dedicated by the bishop of Utrecht in 1306. To transform Oude Kerk into a Calvinist church during the Reformation, Dutch Protestants raided it and destroyed all of the iconographies that showed God or his saints. The church has been relatively intact since the 17th century. Still, it possesses many ancient features, such as its vaulted timber roof that dates back to the Middle Ages, despite having seen more than its fair share of difficulties over the years.

Nieuwe Kerk: The ideal location for formal events

Nieuwe-Kerk
Nieuwe-Kerk

The city of Amsterdam received approval from the bishop of Utrecht to erect a new church on Dam Square in the early 15th century. When it was finished in 1509, it was given the name de Nieuwe Kerk (the New Church) to distinguish it from the older Oude Kerk. Unfortunately, a fire that devastated much of central Amsterdam in 1654 caused significant damage to this structure. A few years later, Nieuwe Kerk was reconstructed in the style of Southern Gothic construction. Because of its close proximity to the Royal Palace, it was the ideal location for formal events, and coronations are still held there. The cathedral now holds exhibitions in addition to religious services, such as the annual World Press Photo fair.

Ons’ Lieve Heer op Solder

Ons-Lieve-Heer-op-Solder
Ons-Lieve-Heer-op-Solder

The newly Protestant Dutch government outlawed Catholicism after the Reformation in the 17th century, forcing adherents to practice their religion covertly. As a result, other covert Catholic churches were built across Amsterdam. Notably, Ons’ Lieve Heer op Solder, a chapel in de Wallen on the top floor of a canal house. The small, hidden sanctuary survived during this trying time, and at the end of the 19th century, it was transformed into a marvelous museum that seems to have stopped time entirely.

Do you know 11 Best Day Trips From Amsterdam You Shouldn’t Miss

English Reformed Church: Serve Amsterdam’s English-speaking community

English-Reformed-Church-Amsterdam
English-Reformed-Church-Amsterdam

This tiny chapel, today known as the English Reformed Church, was taken from a Catholic nun residing inside an enclosed community named Begijnhof behind Spui when the Dutch government converted to Calvinism in 1578. The church was made available to the English-speaking Protestants of the city as a place of worship in 1607. The church has continued to serve Amsterdam’s English-speaking community nearly without interruption since that time, and its weekly ceremonies still take place today. In 2007, to commemorate the church’s 400th anniversary, Queen Elizabeth II paid a visit.

Moses and Aaron Church

Moses-and-Aaron-Church-Amsterdam
Moses-and-Aaron-Church-Amsterdam

This enormous Roman Catholic church sprang from an earlier covert congregation that met in a townhouse on the borders of Amsterdam’s Jewish neighborhood to allow its founding parishioners to worship covertly while Catholicism was outlawed. The church grew and moved into new structures as its membership increased. Before the congregation in question bought one of these homes, Spinoza is claimed to have grown up there. When the Catholic ban was abolished in the middle of the 19th century, the covert church was destroyed, and it was later replaced by a modern, open place of worship.

St. Peter and St. Paul’s Church (The Parrot): Impressive entrance with 2 statues

St-Peter-and-St-Pauls-Church-amsterdam
St-Peter-and-St-Pauls-Church-amsterdam

This little church, hidden inside the busy Kalverstraat in Amsterdam, was built to assist the city’s persecuted Catholic population. The church’s initial Catholic congregation erected it without the visual flourishes connected with the faith to cover up Calvinism’s supremacy. Parishioners were able to practice their faith in a relatively peaceful environment thanks to this simple design’s success in fooling the authorities. A life-size statue of St. Joseph and a sizable parrot sitting on a stand serve as its entrance markers.

Westerkerk: Dutch Renaissance architecture in Amsterdam

Westerkerk
Westerkerk

The distinctive canal belt that runs through Amsterdam was built in the 17th century, and Westerkerk is located on its western side. It was built expressly for Calvinist worship, like Zuiderkerk, and is one of several outstanding specimens of Dutch Renaissance architecture in Amsterdam. Its 86-meter-tall steeple is home to 51 enormous bells that may be heard ringing across de Jordaan. Numerous of Amsterdam’s most well-known historical residents, including Rembrandt van Rijn, is laid to rest at the church, which is the city’s biggest and possibly most significant Calvinist site of worship.

Zuiderkerk: A beautiful church that leaves visitors in awe

Zuiderkerk
Zuiderkerk

During the Reformation, the bulk of the city’s inhabitants switched to Calvinism, prompting the mayor of Amsterdam to choose to construct a brand-new Protestant church just outside of Nieuwmarkt. The Zuiderkerk name was given to the completed church in 1611. (the Southern Church). Unlike the Oude Kerk, this new structure was created particularly to house Protestantism. Therefore, its inside was kept largely barren to adhere to the religion’s humble sensibilities. However, Zuiderkerk is quite lovely and is connected to a massive bell tower that rings happy tunes all day.

Noorderkerk Amsterdam (Northern Church)

Noorderkerk-Amsterdam
Noorderkerk-Amsterdam

Noorderkerk, also known as the Northern Church, was constructed between 1620 and 1623 and is still used as a Calvinist house of worship. Between 1989 and 2005, a stunning restoration was completed. Every Saturday afternoon, Noorderkerk hosts the Noorderkerkconcerten, a classic concert. The Noordermarkt market, which sells organic foods, and the Westerstraat market are nearby traditional marketplaces.

Here are 9 historic churches in Amsterdam you should visit. So, come here immediately to begin your fantastic journey! Please share your thoughts by posting a comment below!

Read more 4 Villages near Amsterdam If You Want To Escape The City

Anna
Annahttps://my-lifestyle.co/
If you want to travel the world through blogs then my articles will satisfy you. With a never-ending journey, I'll take you to the best cities and exciting experiences!
RELATED ARTICLES

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

- Advertisment -

Most Popular