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An Overview Of The Quality Of Life In Canada

For those who are planning to relocate and your chosen destination is Canada, we suggest this post for you. An overview of the quality of life in Canada will give you a closer look before making the final decision.

Health And Safety – Quality Of Life In Canada

Health-And-Safety
Health-And-Safety-In-Canada

Canadians are commonly healthy and the nation doesn’t have widespread concerns with harmful or contagious infections. On average, the expectation of life of a Canadian is quite high,  84 years for women and 80 years for men. 

Only a tiny quantity of Canadians has suffered from HIV/AIDS. However, Canada has the highest proportion of Multiple Sclerosis (MS) in the world. This disease influences around 290 out of every 100,000 residents.

Housing

Housing-In-Canada
Housing-In-Canada

In Canada, the rate of homeownership is about 66%. People who don’t have their own homes often rent apartments, suites, or leased homes from a lessor or property company.

Youngsters commonly live with their parents until they turn 20. Then, they tend to rent a house ‘til their 30s. 

However, many Canadians are now progressively deciding to rent for longer times than the old generations. Expensive homes are a rising concern in many major cities in Canada, in which real estate costs are some of the most elevated worldwide. 

According to the Canadian government, about 150,000 to 300,000 Canadians have experienced homelessness in a specified year.

They then built a network of homeless refugees, which offers short-term places for the Canadian homeless to stay.

Crime And Punishment – Quality Of Life In Canada

Crime-And-Punishment-In-Canada
Crime-And-Punishment-In-Canada

The crime rate in Canada decreased steadily after reaching its peak in the late 20th century. 

The majority of crimes that happened in Canada are without violence. For example, the most typical are small robberies, home thefts, traffic offenses, and public “mischief”. The rest are crimes relevant to the allocation or possession of prohibited drugs. 

The most seen violent violations are aggression, beatings, and forceful robberies. Canada’s slaying rate is approximately 600 a year.

Pollution

Pollution-In-Canada
Pollution-In-Canada

Canada is in the top rank of countries as far as most eco-quality standards are concerned.

According to the WHO, the highest-ranking for air rate in the globe belongs to Canada.  In 2016, the Yale Center for Environmental Law & Policy conducted a study, and Canada scored 85 out of 100 on the environmental quality scale, including water and air quality.

Canada adds about 2% of the planet’s entire greenhouse gas emissions. Though the number is small, it is way too far out of ratio with Canada’s little share of the world population.

This places Canada as one of the globe’s most harmful GHC emitters per unit of population.

As a result, Canada’s public policy now mainly focuses on cutting emissions by the extraction of oil in the prairies. At the same time, they will step by step reduce the use of petroleum-powered cars. 

Since Canada is an extensive country and largely inhabited, the threat of significant human-caused environmental declension is typically low.

Women’s Rights – Quality Of Life In Canada

Women’s-Rights-In-Canada
Women’s-Rights-In-Canada

Under the Canadian constitution, both genders in Canada are stated lawfully equivalent. People will also be protected from the discrimination of gender by the government and private sector firms under different regional and nationwide human rights regulations.

Also, national laws relevant to service, military, marriage, and divorce are officially gender-neutral.

Children’s Rights

Children’s-Rights-In-Canada
Children’s-Rights-In-Canada

Child labor is basically permitted in Canada, however, it is subject to complicated laws set by the regional governments. Though detailed laws differ, generally speaking, youngsters can’t work during school hours and very young kids need the permission of both parents and the government to work. 

Young Canadians from 14 to 17 comprise the majority of Canada’s adolescent employees and work mainly in fast food, retail, or household farming positions.

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Maris Lopez
Maris Lopezhttp:////my-lifestyle.co
Hey there! I'm Maris, an American girl who is passionate about adventure, the outdoors and all things travel!
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